Estimated Electricity Cost Of Mining One Bitcoin By Country

Why i’m bullish on Zilliqa (long read)

Edit: TL;DR added in the comments
 
Hey all, I've been researching coins since 2017 and have gone through 100s of them in the last 3 years. I got introduced to blockchain via Bitcoin of course, analyzed Ethereum thereafter and from that moment I have a keen interest in smart contact platforms. I’m passionate about Ethereum but I find Zilliqa to have a better risk-reward ratio. Especially because Zilliqa has found an elegant balance between being secure, decentralized and scalable in my opinion.
 
Below I post my analysis of why from all the coins I went through I’m most bullish on Zilliqa (yes I went through Tezos, EOS, NEO, VeChain, Harmony, Algorand, Cardano etc.). Note that this is not investment advice and although it's a thorough analysis there is obviously some bias involved. Looking forward to what you all think!
 
Fun fact: the name Zilliqa is a play on ‘silica’ silicon dioxide which means “Silicon for the high-throughput consensus computer.”
 
This post is divided into (i) Technology, (ii) Business & Partnerships, and (iii) Marketing & Community. I’ve tried to make the technology part readable for a broad audience. If you’ve ever tried understanding the inner workings of Bitcoin and Ethereum you should be able to grasp most parts. Otherwise, just skim through and once you are zoning out head to the next part.
 
Technology and some more:
 
Introduction
 
The technology is one of the main reasons why I’m so bullish on Zilliqa. First thing you see on their website is: “Zilliqa is a high-performance, high-security blockchain platform for enterprises and next-generation applications.” These are some bold statements.
 
Before we deep dive into the technology let’s take a step back in time first as they have quite the history. The initial research paper from which Zilliqa originated dates back to August 2016: Elastico: A Secure Sharding Protocol For Open Blockchains where Loi Luu (Kyber Network) is one of the co-authors. Other ideas that led to the development of what Zilliqa has become today are: Bitcoin-NG, collective signing CoSi, ByzCoin and Omniledger.
 
The technical white paper was made public in August 2017 and since then they have achieved everything stated in the white paper and also created their own open source intermediate level smart contract language called Scilla (functional programming language similar to OCaml) too.
 
Mainnet is live since the end of January 2019 with daily transaction rates growing continuously. About a week ago mainnet reached 5 million transactions, 500.000+ addresses in total along with 2400 nodes keeping the network decentralized and secure. Circulating supply is nearing 11 billion and currently only mining rewards are left. The maximum supply is 21 billion with annual inflation being 7.13% currently and will only decrease with time.
 
Zilliqa realized early on that the usage of public cryptocurrencies and smart contracts were increasing but decentralized, secure, and scalable alternatives were lacking in the crypto space. They proposed to apply sharding onto a public smart contract blockchain where the transaction rate increases almost linear with the increase in the amount of nodes. More nodes = higher transaction throughput and increased decentralization. Sharding comes in many forms and Zilliqa uses network-, transaction- and computational sharding. Network sharding opens up the possibility of using transaction- and computational sharding on top. Zilliqa does not use state sharding for now. We’ll come back to this later.
 
Before we continue dissecting how Zilliqa achieves such from a technological standpoint it’s good to keep in mind that a blockchain being decentralised and secure and scalable is still one of the main hurdles in allowing widespread usage of decentralised networks. In my opinion this needs to be solved first before blockchains can get to the point where they can create and add large scale value. So I invite you to read the next section to grasp the underlying fundamentals. Because after all these premises need to be true otherwise there isn’t a fundamental case to be bullish on Zilliqa, right?
 
Down the rabbit hole
 
How have they achieved this? Let’s define the basics first: key players on Zilliqa are the users and the miners. A user is anybody who uses the blockchain to transfer funds or run smart contracts. Miners are the (shard) nodes in the network who run the consensus protocol and get rewarded for their service in Zillings (ZIL). The mining network is divided into several smaller networks called shards, which is also referred to as ‘network sharding’. Miners subsequently are randomly assigned to a shard by another set of miners called DS (Directory Service) nodes. The regular shards process transactions and the outputs of these shards are eventually combined by the DS shard as they reach consensus on the final state. More on how these DS shards reach consensus (via pBFT) will be explained later on.
 
The Zilliqa network produces two types of blocks: DS blocks and Tx blocks. One DS Block consists of 100 Tx Blocks. And as previously mentioned there are two types of nodes concerned with reaching consensus: shard nodes and DS nodes. Becoming a shard node or DS node is being defined by the result of a PoW cycle (Ethash) at the beginning of the DS Block. All candidate mining nodes compete with each other and run the PoW (Proof-of-Work) cycle for 60 seconds and the submissions achieving the highest difficulty will be allowed on the network. And to put it in perspective: the average difficulty for one DS node is ~ 2 Th/s equaling 2.000.000 Mh/s or 55 thousand+ GeForce GTX 1070 / 8 GB GPUs at 35.4 Mh/s. Each DS Block 10 new DS nodes are allowed. And a shard node needs to provide around 8.53 GH/s currently (around 240 GTX 1070s). Dual mining ETH/ETC and ZIL is possible and can be done via mining software such as Phoenix and Claymore. There are pools and if you have large amounts of hashing power (Ethash) available you could mine solo.
 
The PoW cycle of 60 seconds is a peak performance and acts as an entry ticket to the network. The entry ticket is called a sybil resistance mechanism and makes it incredibly hard for adversaries to spawn lots of identities and manipulate the network with these identities. And after every 100 Tx Blocks which corresponds to roughly 1,5 hour this PoW process repeats. In between these 1,5 hour, no PoW needs to be done meaning Zilliqa’s energy consumption to keep the network secure is low. For more detailed information on how mining works click here.
Okay, hats off to you. You have made it this far. Before we go any deeper down the rabbit hole we first must understand why Zilliqa goes through all of the above technicalities and understand a bit more what a blockchain on a more fundamental level is. Because the core of Zilliqa’s consensus protocol relies on the usage of pBFT (practical Byzantine Fault Tolerance) we need to know more about state machines and their function. Navigate to Viewblock, a Zilliqa block explorer, and just come back to this article. We will use this site to navigate through a few concepts.
 
We have established that Zilliqa is a public and distributed blockchain. Meaning that everyone with an internet connection can send ZILs, trigger smart contracts, etc. and there is no central authority who fully controls the network. Zilliqa and other public and distributed blockchains (like Bitcoin and Ethereum) can also be defined as state machines.
 
Taking the liberty of paraphrasing examples and definitions given by Samuel Brooks’ medium article, he describes the definition of a blockchain (like Zilliqa) as: “A peer-to-peer, append-only datastore that uses consensus to synchronize cryptographically-secure data”.
 
Next, he states that: "blockchains are fundamentally systems for managing valid state transitions”. For some more context, I recommend reading the whole medium article to get a better grasp of the definitions and understanding of state machines. Nevertheless, let’s try to simplify and compile it into a single paragraph. Take traffic lights as an example: all its states (red, amber, and green) are predefined, all possible outcomes are known and it doesn’t matter if you encounter the traffic light today or tomorrow. It will still behave the same. Managing the states of a traffic light can be done by triggering a sensor on the road or pushing a button resulting in one traffic lights’ state going from green to red (via amber) and another light from red to green.
 
With public blockchains like Zilliqa, this isn’t so straightforward and simple. It started with block #1 almost 1,5 years ago and every 45 seconds or so a new block linked to the previous block is being added. Resulting in a chain of blocks with transactions in it that everyone can verify from block #1 to the current #647.000+ block. The state is ever changing and the states it can find itself in are infinite. And while the traffic light might work together in tandem with various other traffic lights, it’s rather insignificant comparing it to a public blockchain. Because Zilliqa consists of 2400 nodes who need to work together to achieve consensus on what the latest valid state is while some of these nodes may have latency or broadcast issues, drop offline or are deliberately trying to attack the network, etc.
 
Now go back to the Viewblock page take a look at the amount of transaction, addresses, block and DS height and then hit refresh. Obviously as expected you see new incremented values on one or all parameters. And how did the Zilliqa blockchain manage to transition from a previous valid state to the latest valid state? By using pBFT to reach consensus on the latest valid state.
 
After having obtained the entry ticket, miners execute pBFT to reach consensus on the ever-changing state of the blockchain. pBFT requires a series of network communication between nodes, and as such there is no GPU involved (but CPU). Resulting in the total energy consumed to keep the blockchain secure, decentralized and scalable being low.
 
pBFT stands for practical Byzantine Fault Tolerance and is an optimization on the Byzantine Fault Tolerant algorithm. To quote Blockonomi: “In the context of distributed systems, Byzantine Fault Tolerance is the ability of a distributed computer network to function as desired and correctly reach a sufficient consensus despite malicious components (nodes) of the system failing or propagating incorrect information to other peers.” Zilliqa is such a distributed computer network and depends on the honesty of the nodes (shard and DS) to reach consensus and to continuously update the state with the latest block. If pBFT is a new term for you I can highly recommend the Blockonomi article.
 
The idea of pBFT was introduced in 1999 - one of the authors even won a Turing award for it - and it is well researched and applied in various blockchains and distributed systems nowadays. If you want more advanced information than the Blockonomi link provides click here. And if you’re in between Blockonomi and the University of Singapore read the Zilliqa Design Story Part 2 dating from October 2017.
Quoting from the Zilliqa tech whitepaper: “pBFT relies upon a correct leader (which is randomly selected) to begin each phase and proceed when the sufficient majority exists. In case the leader is byzantine it can stall the entire consensus protocol. To address this challenge, pBFT offers a view change protocol to replace the byzantine leader with another one.”
 
pBFT can tolerate ⅓ of the nodes being dishonest (offline counts as Byzantine = dishonest) and the consensus protocol will function without stalling or hiccups. Once there are more than ⅓ of dishonest nodes but no more than ⅔ the network will be stalled and a view change will be triggered to elect a new DS leader. Only when more than ⅔ of the nodes are dishonest (66%) double-spend attacks become possible.
 
If the network stalls no transactions can be processed and one has to wait until a new honest leader has been elected. When the mainnet was just launched and in its early phases, view changes happened regularly. As of today the last stalling of the network - and view change being triggered - was at the end of October 2019.
 
Another benefit of using pBFT for consensus besides low energy is the immediate finality it provides. Once your transaction is included in a block and the block is added to the chain it’s done. Lastly, take a look at this article where three types of finality are being defined: probabilistic, absolute and economic finality. Zilliqa falls under the absolute finality (just like Tendermint for example). Although lengthy already we skipped through some of the inner workings from Zilliqa’s consensus: read the Zilliqa Design Story Part 3 and you will be close to having a complete picture on it. Enough about PoW, sybil resistance mechanism, pBFT, etc. Another thing we haven’t looked at yet is the amount of decentralization.
 
Decentralisation
 
Currently, there are four shards, each one of them consisting of 600 nodes. 1 shard with 600 so-called DS nodes (Directory Service - they need to achieve a higher difficulty than shard nodes) and 1800 shard nodes of which 250 are shard guards (centralized nodes controlled by the team). The amount of shard guards has been steadily declining from 1200 in January 2019 to 250 as of May 2020. On the Viewblock statistics, you can see that many of the nodes are being located in the US but those are only the (CPU parts of the) shard nodes who perform pBFT. There is no data from where the PoW sources are coming. And when the Zilliqa blockchain starts reaching its transaction capacity limit, a network upgrade needs to be executed to lift the current cap of maximum 2400 nodes to allow more nodes and formation of more shards which will allow to network to keep on scaling according to demand.
Besides shard nodes there are also seed nodes. The main role of seed nodes is to serve as direct access points (for end-users and clients) to the core Zilliqa network that validates transactions. Seed nodes consolidate transaction requests and forward these to the lookup nodes (another type of nodes) for distribution to the shards in the network. Seed nodes also maintain the entire transaction history and the global state of the blockchain which is needed to provide services such as block explorers. Seed nodes in the Zilliqa network are comparable to Infura on Ethereum.
 
The seed nodes were first only operated by Zilliqa themselves, exchanges and Viewblock. Operators of seed nodes like exchanges had no incentive to open them for the greater public. They were centralised at first. Decentralisation at the seed nodes level has been steadily rolled out since March 2020 ( Zilliqa Improvement Proposal 3 ). Currently the amount of seed nodes is being increased, they are public-facing and at the same time PoS is applied to incentivize seed node operators and make it possible for ZIL holders to stake and earn passive yields. Important distinction: seed nodes are not involved with consensus! That is still PoW as entry ticket and pBFT for the actual consensus.
 
5% of the block rewards are being assigned to seed nodes (from the beginning in 2019) and those are being used to pay out ZIL stakers. The 5% block rewards with an annual yield of 10.03% translate to roughly 610 MM ZILs in total that can be staked. Exchanges use the custodial variant of staking and wallets like Moonlet will use the non-custodial version (starting in Q3 2020). Staking is being done by sending ZILs to a smart contract created by Zilliqa and audited by Quantstamp.
 
With a high amount of DS; shard nodes and seed nodes becoming more decentralized too, Zilliqa qualifies for the label of decentralized in my opinion.
 
Smart contracts
 
Let me start by saying I’m not a developer and my programming skills are quite limited. So I‘m taking the ELI5 route (maybe 12) but if you are familiar with Javascript, Solidity or specifically OCaml please head straight to Scilla - read the docs to get a good initial grasp of how Zilliqa’s smart contract language Scilla works and if you ask yourself “why another programming language?” check this article. And if you want to play around with some sample contracts in an IDE click here. The faucet can be found here. And more information on architecture, dapp development and API can be found on the Developer Portal.
If you are more into listening and watching: check this recent webinar explaining Zilliqa and Scilla. Link is time-stamped so you’ll start right away with a platform introduction, roadmap 2020 and afterwards a proper Scilla introduction.
 
Generalized: programming languages can be divided into being ‘object-oriented’ or ‘functional’. Here is an ELI5 given by software development academy: * “all programs have two basic components, data – what the program knows – and behavior – what the program can do with that data. So object-oriented programming states that combining data and related behaviors in one place, is called “object”, which makes it easier to understand how a particular program works. On the other hand, functional programming argues that data and behavior are different things and should be separated to ensure their clarity.” *
 
Scilla is on the functional side and shares similarities with OCaml: OCaml is a general-purpose programming language with an emphasis on expressiveness and safety. It has an advanced type system that helps catch your mistakes without getting in your way. It's used in environments where a single mistake can cost millions and speed matters, is supported by an active community, and has a rich set of libraries and development tools. For all its power, OCaml is also pretty simple, which is one reason it's often used as a teaching language.
 
Scilla is blockchain agnostic, can be implemented onto other blockchains as well, is recognized by academics and won a so-called Distinguished Artifact Award award at the end of last year.
 
One of the reasons why the Zilliqa team decided to create their own programming language focused on preventing smart contract vulnerabilities is that adding logic on a blockchain, programming, means that you cannot afford to make mistakes. Otherwise, it could cost you. It’s all great and fun blockchains being immutable but updating your code because you found a bug isn’t the same as with a regular web application for example. And with smart contracts, it inherently involves cryptocurrencies in some form thus value.
 
Another difference with programming languages on a blockchain is gas. Every transaction you do on a smart contract platform like Zilliqa or Ethereum costs gas. With gas you basically pay for computational costs. Sending a ZIL from address A to address B costs 0.001 ZIL currently. Smart contracts are more complex, often involve various functions and require more gas (if gas is a new concept click here ).
 
So with Scilla, similar to Solidity, you need to make sure that “every function in your smart contract will run as expected without hitting gas limits. An improper resource analysis may lead to situations where funds may get stuck simply because a part of the smart contract code cannot be executed due to gas limits. Such constraints are not present in traditional software systems”. Scilla design story part 1
 
Some examples of smart contract issues you’d want to avoid are: leaking funds, ‘unexpected changes to critical state variables’ (example: someone other than you setting his or her address as the owner of the smart contract after creation) or simply killing a contract.
 
Scilla also allows for formal verification. Wikipedia to the rescue: In the context of hardware and software systems, formal verification is the act of proving or disproving the correctness of intended algorithms underlying a system with respect to a certain formal specification or property, using formal methods of mathematics.
 
Formal verification can be helpful in proving the correctness of systems such as: cryptographic protocols, combinational circuits, digital circuits with internal memory, and software expressed as source code.
 
Scilla is being developed hand-in-hand with formalization of its semantics and its embedding into the Coq proof assistant — a state-of-the art tool for mechanized proofs about properties of programs.”
 
Simply put, with Scilla and accompanying tooling developers can be mathematically sure and proof that the smart contract they’ve written does what he or she intends it to do.
 
Smart contract on a sharded environment and state sharding
 
There is one more topic I’d like to touch on: smart contract execution in a sharded environment (and what is the effect of state sharding). This is a complex topic. I’m not able to explain it any easier than what is posted here. But I will try to compress the post into something easy to digest.
 
Earlier on we have established that Zilliqa can process transactions in parallel due to network sharding. This is where the linear scalability comes from. We can define simple transactions: a transaction from address A to B (Category 1), a transaction where a user interacts with one smart contract (Category 2) and the most complex ones where triggering a transaction results in multiple smart contracts being involved (Category 3). The shards are able to process transactions on their own without interference of the other shards. With Category 1 transactions that is doable, with Category 2 transactions sometimes if that address is in the same shard as the smart contract but with Category 3 you definitely need communication between the shards. Solving that requires to make a set of communication rules the protocol needs to follow in order to process all transactions in a generalised fashion.
 
And this is where the downsides of state sharding comes in currently. All shards in Zilliqa have access to the complete state. Yes the state size (0.1 GB at the moment) grows and all of the nodes need to store it but it also means that they don’t need to shop around for information available on other shards. Requiring more communication and adding more complexity. Computer science knowledge and/or developer knowledge required links if you want to dig further: Scilla - language grammar Scilla - Foundations for Verifiable Decentralised Computations on a Blockchain Gas Accounting NUS x Zilliqa: Smart contract language workshop
 
Easier to follow links on programming Scilla https://learnscilla.com/home Ivan on Tech
 
Roadmap / Zilliqa 2.0
 
There is no strict defined roadmap but here are topics being worked on. And via the Zilliqa website there is also more information on the projects they are working on.
 
Business & Partnerships
 
It’s not only technology in which Zilliqa seems to be excelling as their ecosystem has been expanding and starting to grow rapidly. The project is on a mission to provide OpenFinance (OpFi) to the world and Singapore is the right place to be due to its progressive regulations and futuristic thinking. Singapore has taken a proactive approach towards cryptocurrencies by introducing the Payment Services Act 2019 (PS Act). Among other things, the PS Act will regulate intermediaries dealing with certain cryptocurrencies, with a particular focus on consumer protection and anti-money laundering. It will also provide a stable regulatory licensing and operating framework for cryptocurrency entities, effectively covering all crypto businesses and exchanges based in Singapore. According to PWC 82% of the surveyed executives in Singapore reported blockchain initiatives underway and 13% of them have already brought the initiatives live to the market. There is also an increasing list of organizations that are starting to provide digital payment services. Moreover, Singaporean blockchain developers Building Cities Beyond has recently created an innovation $15 million grant to encourage development on its ecosystem. This all suggests that Singapore tries to position itself as (one of) the leading blockchain hubs in the world.
 
Zilliqa seems to already take advantage of this and recently helped launch Hg Exchange on their platform, together with financial institutions PhillipCapital, PrimePartners and Fundnel. Hg Exchange, which is now approved by the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS), uses smart contracts to represent digital assets. Through Hg Exchange financial institutions worldwide can use Zilliqa's safe-by-design smart contracts to enable the trading of private equities. For example, think of companies such as Grab, Airbnb, SpaceX that are not available for public trading right now. Hg Exchange will allow investors to buy shares of private companies & unicorns and capture their value before an IPO. Anquan, the main company behind Zilliqa, has also recently announced that they became a partner and shareholder in TEN31 Bank, which is a fully regulated bank allowing for tokenization of assets and is aiming to bridge the gap between conventional banking and the blockchain world. If STOs, the tokenization of assets, and equity trading will continue to increase, then Zilliqa’s public blockchain would be the ideal candidate due to its strategic positioning, partnerships, regulatory compliance and the technology that is being built on top of it.
 
What is also very encouraging is their focus on banking the un(der)banked. They are launching a stablecoin basket starting with XSGD. As many of you know, stablecoins are currently mostly used for trading. However, Zilliqa is actively trying to broaden the use case of stablecoins. I recommend everybody to read this text that Amrit Kumar wrote (one of the co-founders). These stablecoins will be integrated in the traditional markets and bridge the gap between the crypto world and the traditional world. This could potentially revolutionize and legitimise the crypto space if retailers and companies will for example start to use stablecoins for payments or remittances, instead of it solely being used for trading.
 
Zilliqa also released their DeFi strategic roadmap (dating November 2019) which seems to be aligning well with their OpFi strategy. A non-custodial DEX is coming to Zilliqa made by Switcheo which allows cross-chain trading (atomic swaps) between ETH, EOS and ZIL based tokens. They also signed a Memorandum of Understanding for a (soon to be announced) USD stablecoin. And as Zilliqa is all about regulations and being compliant, I’m speculating on it to be a regulated USD stablecoin. Furthermore, XSGD is already created and visible on block explorer and XIDR (Indonesian Stablecoin) is also coming soon via StraitsX. Here also an overview of the Tech Stack for Financial Applications from September 2019. Further quoting Amrit Kumar on this:
 
There are two basic building blocks in DeFi/OpFi though: 1) stablecoins as you need a non-volatile currency to get access to this market and 2) a dex to be able to trade all these financial assets. The rest are built on top of these blocks.
 
So far, together with our partners and community, we have worked on developing these building blocks with XSGD as a stablecoin. We are working on bringing a USD-backed stablecoin as well. We will soon have a decentralised exchange developed by Switcheo. And with HGX going live, we are also venturing into the tokenization space. More to come in the future.”
 
Additionally, they also have this ZILHive initiative that injects capital into projects. There have been already 6 waves of various teams working on infrastructure, innovation and research, and they are not from ASEAN or Singapore only but global: see Grantees breakdown by country. Over 60 project teams from over 20 countries have contributed to Zilliqa's ecosystem. This includes individuals and teams developing wallets, explorers, developer toolkits, smart contract testing frameworks, dapps, etc. As some of you may know, Unstoppable Domains (UD) blew up when they launched on Zilliqa. UD aims to replace cryptocurrency addresses with a human-readable name and allows for uncensorable websites. Zilliqa will probably be the only one able to handle all these transactions onchain due to ability to scale and its resulting low fees which is why the UD team launched this on Zilliqa in the first place. Furthermore, Zilliqa also has a strong emphasis on security, compliance, and privacy, which is why they partnered with companies like Elliptic, ChainSecurity (part of PwC Switzerland), and Incognito. Their sister company Aqilliz (Zilliqa spelled backwards) focuses on revolutionizing the digital advertising space and is doing interesting things like using Zilliqa to track outdoor digital ads with companies like Foodpanda.
 
Zilliqa is listed on nearly all major exchanges, having several different fiat-gateways and recently have been added to Binance’s margin trading and futures trading with really good volume. They also have a very impressive team with good credentials and experience. They don't just have “tech people”. They have a mix of tech people, business people, marketeers, scientists, and more. Naturally, it's good to have a mix of people with different skill sets if you work in the crypto space.
 
Marketing & Community
 
Zilliqa has a very strong community. If you just follow their Twitter their engagement is much higher for a coin that has approximately 80k followers. They also have been ‘coin of the day’ by LunarCrush many times. LunarCrush tracks real-time cryptocurrency value and social data. According to their data, it seems Zilliqa has a more fundamental and deeper understanding of marketing and community engagement than almost all other coins. While almost all coins have been a bit frozen in the last months, Zilliqa seems to be on its own bull run. It was somewhere in the 100s a few months ago and is currently ranked #46 on CoinGecko. Their official Telegram also has over 20k people and is very active, and their community channel which is over 7k now is more active and larger than many other official channels. Their local communities also seem to be growing.
 
Moreover, their community started ‘Zillacracy’ together with the Zilliqa core team ( see www.zillacracy.com ). It’s a community-run initiative where people from all over the world are now helping with marketing and development on Zilliqa. Since its launch in February 2020 they have been doing a lot and will also run their own non-custodial seed node for staking. This seed node will also allow them to start generating revenue for them to become a self sustaining entity that could potentially scale up to become a decentralized company working in parallel with the Zilliqa core team. Comparing it to all the other smart contract platforms (e.g. Cardano, EOS, Tezos etc.) they don't seem to have started a similar initiative (correct me if I’m wrong though). This suggests in my opinion that these other smart contract platforms do not fully understand how to utilize the ‘power of the community’. This is something you cannot ‘buy with money’ and gives many projects in the space a disadvantage.
 
Zilliqa also released two social products called SocialPay and Zeeves. SocialPay allows users to earn ZILs while tweeting with a specific hashtag. They have recently used it in partnership with the Singapore Red Cross for a marketing campaign after their initial pilot program. It seems like a very valuable social product with a good use case. I can see a lot of traditional companies entering the space through this product, which they seem to suggest will happen. Tokenizing hashtags with smart contracts to get network effect is a very smart and innovative idea.
 
Regarding Zeeves, this is a tipping bot for Telegram. They already have 1000s of signups and they plan to keep upgrading it for more and more people to use it (e.g. they recently have added a quiz features). They also use it during AMAs to reward people in real-time. It’s a very smart approach to grow their communities and get familiar with ZIL. I can see this becoming very big on Telegram. This tool suggests, again, that the Zilliqa team has a deeper understanding of what the crypto space and community needs and is good at finding the right innovative tools to grow and scale.
 
To be honest, I haven’t covered everything (i’m also reaching the character limited haha). So many updates happening lately that it's hard to keep up, such as the International Monetary Fund mentioning Zilliqa in their report, custodial and non-custodial Staking, Binance Margin, Futures, Widget, entering the Indian market, and more. The Head of Marketing Colin Miles has also released this as an overview of what is coming next. And last but not least, Vitalik Buterin has been mentioning Zilliqa lately acknowledging Zilliqa and mentioning that both projects have a lot of room to grow. There is much more info of course and a good part of it has been served to you on a silver platter. I invite you to continue researching by yourself :-) And if you have any comments or questions please post here!
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    8. Bee macro. (184 points, 4 comments)
    9. Het Gekkenhuis - a Dutch caricature map of Europe, 1914. (180 points, 2 comments)
    10. The oarfish, the world's largest known bony fish, is thought to have spawned tales of seas serpents. (178 points, 25 comments)
  4. 4762 points, 58 submissions: wormspermgrrl
    1. During Florida winters, manatees flock to nuclear and coal power plants for the warm water discharges. (414 points, 29 comments)
    2. Happy Birthday song ruled public domain as judge throws out copyright claim (202 points, 8 comments)
    3. 18 cities in Pennsylvania reported higher levels of lead exposure than Flint (194 points, 8 comments)
    4. xkcd: Log Scale (191 points, 8 comments)
    5. Parade Magazine's Ask Marilyn Controversy: The Time Everyone “Corrected” the World’s Smartest Woman (174 points, 18 comments)
    6. Maryam Mirzakhani won the Fields Medal in 2014; she is the first woman to win math’s most prestigious prize (163 points, 1 comment)
    7. Meet the woman who makes fake fingers for Japan's reformed gangsters (161 points, 3 comments)
    8. Google's self-driving car gets pulled over for driving too slowly (157 points, 40 comments)
    9. The Wieliczka Salt Mine, Poland (154 points, 12 comments)
    10. The Decemberists - "The Mariner's Revenge Song" (149 points, 14 comments)
  5. 2906 points, 31 submissions: jaykirsch
    1. 1989 Plymouth Voyager III concept. This is a two piece detachable vehicle (link in comments) (220 points, 21 comments)
    2. "Mission Accomplished" fly-in and speech May 1, 2003. Enormous political PR blunder. (206 points, 5 comments)
    3. Prepared for gas attack in France, WW1 (202 points, 6 comments)
    4. Les Paul with Paul McCartney and a Gibson left-handed "Special." 1988 (201 points, 9 comments)
    5. "Pictured Rocks" on Lake Superior near Munising, MI (180 points, 7 comments)
    6. Art Deco in the home - stylish 1937 GE radio (146 points, 9 comments)
    7. Woody Guthrie on the attack, 1941 (141 points, 2 comments)
    8. The Great 1918 Influenza Pandemic claimed more lives than WW1, including 675,000 (est.) Americans. (Article link in comments) (135 points, 6 comments)
    9. Come on in, kids, I have some pie and a magic mushroom. (129 points, 10 comments)
    10. Yooper "Pastie" in Michigan's UP (122 points, 25 comments)
  6. 2882 points, 23 submissions: appropriate-username
    1. "We come in peace" (470 points, 10 comments)
    2. This GIF illustrates why your phone camera takes weird photos of revolving propellers. (325 points, 12 comments)
    3. An electrical current causing water to form a bridge. (xpost/gifs) (276 points, 10 comments)
    4. This series of photos got the photographer banned from Magic TCG tournaments and is among the top 5 top posts of all time on Reddit (266 points, 33 comments)
    5. "My girlfriend keeps sending me her squids" (245 points, 9 comments)
    6. Pocky is a popular Japanese snack consisting of a cracker-like stick partially covered in chocolate--I can't believe nobody posted it so I can upvote it. Here's a picture of Pocky; the wiki article on it is in the comments. (177 points, 46 comments)
    7. An animated short about a lazy guy in space--35th most popular reddit post of all time (158 points, 10 comments)
    8. xkcd: Centrifugal Force (124 points, 3 comments)
    9. 1,000 x 1,000 x 1,000 Rubik's Cube Solve (by a computer) (114 points, 10 comments)
    10. xkcd: Earth Temperature Timeline (86 points, 4 comments)
  7. 2385 points, 30 submissions: sbroue
    1. Flying hammock [gif] (275 points, 13 comments)
    2. Property for Rent: No Asians (224 points, 17 comments)
    3. Gobi warns his shrimp housekeeper of approaching predator (140 points, 11 comments)
    4. First taste of chocolate for Ivory Coast Cocoa farmers (126 points, 10 comments)
    5. "Hurricane" Higgins finishes the match [gif] (119 points, 17 comments)
    6. Big Booty Bitches (Original Video) (116 points, 16 comments)
    7. The Blessing and launching of HMS Albion (1898) created a wave that drowned 39 people, you see them bottom left in some of the earliest disaster footage (110 points, 6 comments)
    8. Pizza with mini meat-pies baked in the crust Australian frankenfood (106 points, 6 comments)
    9. Bought for £1, the mysterious tower that inspired JRR Tolkien (101 points, 1 comment)
    10. Castro meets Nixon: April 1959 [pic] (100 points, 4 comments)
  8. 1687 points, 32 submissions: ceegee1975
    1. Nicolas Cage returns stolen dinosaur skull he bought at auction for $276,000 (192 points, 11 comments)
    2. Why Hypercolor T-Shirts Were Just a One-Hit Wonder (99 points, 15 comments)
    3. Clean My Space. A youtube channel devoted to cleaning just about anything (98 points, 3 comments)
    4. Scientists have breached the blood-brain barrier for the first time to treat a brain tumour (83 points, 2 comments)
    5. They Might Be Giants-Ana Ng (78 points, 8 comments)
    6. How It's Made: Balloons (74 points, 4 comments)
    7. Mr. Bean The Movie - 'Gun' Scene (72 points, 6 comments)
    8. The Best Homemade Girl Scout Cookie Recipes (71 points, 5 comments)
    9. Monty Python - How Not to Be Seen (68 points, 2 comments)
    10. George Carlin - Euphemisms (65 points, 8 comments)
  9. 1623 points, 13 submissions: mrekted
    1. Legendary con man, scam artist, and forger Frank Abagnale Jr. pictured in the pilots seat of a Pan Am airliner. He flew over 1,000,000 miles while wearing a Pan Am uniform. He was never their employee, nor was he a pilot. (484 points, 24 comments)
    2. What It's Like When Reddit Wrongly Accuses Your Loved One Of Murder - The Boston Marathon Bomber Reddit Witch Hunt (240 points, 23 comments)
    3. Tim's Vermeer - Penn Jillette chronicles a mans ridiculously compulsive and obsessive five year obsession with reverse engineering and mastering the artistic techniques of Dutch master painter Vermeer (148 points, 6 comments)
    4. Cadillac Ranch, Amarillo TX. A bizarre, macabre tribute to the American love affair with the automobile. Visitors are encouraged to add their own ideas and messages to the memorial with spray paint. (133 points, 7 comments)
    5. 2010 - Reddit comes to the aid of a terminally ill little girl who was being cruelly harassed by her neighbors (126 points, 7 comments)
    6. In 2013, a UK man scoured the local dump after realizing he threw away a hard disk that contained 7500 bitcoins. At current market value those coins are worth a little over 5.5 million USD. (125 points, 4 comments)
    7. A float in the first Macy's Day Parade in 1924 (95 points, 1 comment)
    8. On Halloween 1938, Orson Welles enters legend with a radio play that convinced listeners that the planet was under attack by aliens from outer space (68 points, 1 comment)
    9. That's one fuckin' nice kitty right there. (51 points, 0 comments)
    10. Stampedes, pepper spray, fist fights, shootouts, and death. This is Black Friday in the United States. (49 points, 4 comments)
  10. 1535 points, 23 submissions: themanwhosleptin
    1. The reason why The Simpsons are yellow is because the creator Matt Groening wanted them to be recognizable when you flip through channels on the TV (194 points, 7 comments)
    2. Shoes (189 points, 3 comments)
    3. On April Fool's Day 2014, NPR posted a fake article on its Facebook page titled "Why Doesn't America Read Anymore?" When clicking on the post, the article asks its readers to not comment on it. Not surprisingly, many people commented anyway. (167 points, 7 comments)
    4. Gran Torino (2008) - a film about an elderly racist Korean War vet, his Hmong neighbors, and their struggles with street gangs (115 points, 11 comments)
    5. Napoleon's Exile In Saint Helena (91 points, 2 comments)
    6. Munchkin - a card game that parodies tabletop RPGs) (90 points, 7 comments)
    7. Meet Brother Najeeb Michael, the monk who saved thousands of manuscripts from IS jihadists (66 points, 1 comment)
    8. The Jimmy Timmy Power Hour - a television crossover film trilogy set between the universes in The Adventures of Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius and The Fairly OddParents (66 points, 2 comments)
    9. Tibetan Monks and Nuns Turn Their Minds Toward Science (51 points, 1 comment)
    10. The Rule of Thirds - a fundamental technique in photography (47 points, 0 comments)
  11. 1218 points, 14 submissions: justtoclick
    1. "Do it yourself doodler" album (359 points, 8 comments)
    2. If Harry Potter was an anime series (171 points, 37 comments)
    3. The Muppets explain Phenomenology (122 points, 4 comments)
    4. Hawaii Still Has a Leprosy Colony With Six Patients (94 points, 17 comments)
    5. David Bowie song 'Changes' inspired Brandon Flowers to form The Killers (59 points, 4 comments)
    6. Dave Barry’s 2015 Year in Review (57 points, 1 comment)
    7. U.S. Muslims to overtake Jews by 2026 (53 points, 9 comments)
    8. The Beatles Play Ed Sullivan: The Historic TV Appearance Heralding the British Invasion (52 points, 0 comments)
    9. The Evolution of Batman's Bat Symbol [Infographic] (51 points, 10 comments)
    10. Cycling With the Psycos -- Counterculture feminism in East L.A (48 points, 0 comments)
  12. 1191 points, 14 submissions: Lillyclown
    1. A Pocket Guide to Vaginal Euphemisms (197 points, 33 comments)
    2. The story behind the McDonalds hot coffee lawsuit (165 points, 28 comments)
    3. The Polish Beer Drinking Party (PPPP), orginally a satirical political party to promote beer, not vodka, and fight alcoholism, won 16 seats in the 1991 parliamentary election. Later splitting to Big Beer and Little Beer. (126 points, 6 comments)
    4. History of Color (115 points, 3 comments)
    5. The Chemistry of Ice Cream (89 points, 6 comments)
    6. 150 year old sunken steam boat's contents. Including still edible food! (87 points, 3 comments)
    7. The Strangest, Most Spectacular Bridge Collapse (65 points, 7 comments)
    8. All Blacks haka (61 points, 1 comment)
    9. The Poisoning of a City (61 points, 0 comments)
    10. British Police use Tea as a perfect analogy for sexual consent. (57 points, 9 comments)
  13. 1147 points, 14 submissions: Radu316
    1. There's a statue of Lenin at the Pole of Inaccessibility in Antarctica. It was on top of a Soviet research station in the 60s. Abandoned in '67, it was forgotten until 2007 when it was rediscovered by a team of explorers. By then, the statue was the only part still visible. (167 points, 2 comments)
    2. Strelka was one of the first animals in space to return safely. She became a sensation in the Soviet Union and had puppies with cosmo-dog Pushok. Nikita Khrushchev gave a puppy, Pushinka, to JFK as a gift. She also had puppies and Strelka's bloodline is still alive in the United States. (147 points, 7 comments)
    3. The Turk was an 18th century chess-playing automaton. It went on a tour of Europe and America, defeating noted chess players like Ben Franklin and Napoleon. After being destroyed in a fire, it was revealed to be a hoax - a person (usually a chessmaster) hid inside and operated it. (136 points, 10 comments)
    4. "Houston, we have a problem" is a slight misquote popularized by the Apollo 13 movie. The real line was actually "Houston, we've had a problem" and was first said by astronaut John Swigert, not mission captain Jim Lovell. (115 points, 14 comments)
    5. Marginalia are all the various scribbles and comments made in margins of books or documents. In medieval times, religious texts written by nuns and monks featured marginalia with all sorts of vulgar images and dirty jokes. (96 points, 5 comments)
    6. Brain crater on Mars. The bizarre texture of the crater floor makes it resemble a brain. NASA worked out that, at 0.6 miles wide, the brain is about the right size to fit inside the mound known as the Face of Mars. (90 points, 0 comments)
    7. Statue of Alexander the Great taming Bucephalus. Bucephalus is often regarded as the most famous (real) horse in history. According to Plutarch, the horse died at the Battle of the Hydaspes in 326 BC. Afterwards Alexander founded the city of Bucephalia in his honor somewhere in modern day Pakistan. (81 points, 4 comments)
    8. Pretty much everything there is to know about tartan (aka plaid in America). The pattern of the kilt can be used to display your family background, royal lineage, service in specific branches of the military, even your name. You can even register new ones at the Scottish Register of Tartans. (79 points, 4 comments)
    9. "There's a sucker born every minute" is a quote attributed to P.T. Barnum, but it was actually said by David Hannum, one of his competitors. Hannum said it referring to people who paid to see Barnum's Cardiff Giant instead of his original, not realizing that both were fake. (60 points, 0 comments)
    10. Heart of Neolithic Orkney is a 5,000-year old world heritage site in Scotland. It includes four monuments: two ceremonial stone circles, a tomb and a former village called Skara Brae. Skara Brae is sometimes called "Scottish Pompeii" because it is so well-preserved. (47 points, 2 comments)
  14. 1128 points, 13 submissions: StochasticLife
    1. Banned until the 1980's, rock music in the USSR was smuggled around the country on records made from X Ray film. They were called 'Ribs' or 'Bone Records'. (216 points, 14 comments)
    2. Lithuania has only ever had a single king, Mindaugus. He was crowned king in 1251 and assassinated in 1263. (157 points, 5 comments)
    3. Russian had a monopoly on Vodka for over 400 years (1540's - 1992) and at one point Vodka sales made up 40% of the state's revenue (130 points, 8 comments)
    4. A nickelodeon was a hastily assembled movie theater, often setup in converted store fronts, that charged a nickle for admission. They were most popular between 1905 and 1915.) (114 points, 0 comments)
    5. Christopher Hitchen's video - Mother Theresa Hell's Angel, a critical look at her political relationships and the nature of her charitable practices. (109 points, 11 comments)
    6. Zatoichi, about a blind swordsmen, is one of Japan longest running film and TV series with over 27 films and 100 TV Episodes. (91 points, 6 comments)
    7. The oldest (surviving), and largest, Baha'i house of worship is in Wilmette Illiniois.) (64 points, 8 comments)
    8. Some humans (all women) are tetrachromats and are capable of seeing millions of colors the rest of us can't see (60 points, 10 comments)
    9. Geddy Lee of Rush was born in Canada to parents who were Polish Immigrants and holocaust survivors of Auschwitz, Dachu, and Bergen-Belsen. (50 points, 2 comments)
    10. North Korea prints the best counterfeit $100 (USD) bills in the world; they have been dubbed the 'Supernote' (45 points, 0 comments)
  15. 910 points, 8 submissions: frigate
    1. Salmon farmers choose the desired orangness-pinkness of their product from a colour chart (SalmoFan) provided by a company which supplies the food dyes to colour farmed salmon that would otherwise be gray, khaki, pale yellow, or pale pink (191 points, 10 comments)
    2. Kurt Vonnegut humorously graphs the shapes of stories (162 points, 5 comments)
    3. The Highway Hi-Fi: the short-lived record player designed for use in automobiles in the 1950's (155 points, 10 comments)
    4. H&M is making a $99 wedding dress. Here’s what that says about economics. (138 points, 43 comments)
    5. How a Math Genius Hacked OkCupid to Find True Love (100 points, 18 comments)
    6. A few of the most impressive and iconic pipe organs from around the world (81 points, 3 comments)
    7. Truth and Reconciliation Commission: By the numbers – The odds of a child dying in a residential school were about the same as a Canadian soldier dying in World War 2 (48 points, 2 comments)
    8. Gordon Lightfoot superfans cherish every show – "Lightfoot lifers" are fans of Gordon Lightfoot who see as many performances as possible (35 points, 1 comment)
  16. 854 points, 5 submissions: CryptoCollectibles
    1. Cows Playing With Hay .gif (351 points, 24 comments)
    2. Super Antics #8 by Kerry Callen (303 points, 18 comments)
    3. This Ad for /Bitcoin made Two Years Ago, As relevant today as ever describing CryptoCurrency (114 points, 3 comments)
    4. How to Draw Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles from 1986 (43 points, 1 comment)
    5. DIY: 25 Wearable Geek Projects You Can Knit or Crochet (43 points, 0 comments)
  17. 698 points, 7 submissions: goofballl
    1. Hongdae's (in Seoul) Love Museum features a single exhibit on the history of pornography in Korea. The rest of the museum is taken up with interactive sex-related photo ops. (203 points, 6 comments)
    2. Last known VCR maker stopped production in July, 40 years after VHS format launch (140 points, 9 comments)
    3. Although the exact cause for vitiligo remains unknown, it is thought to be caused by the immune system attacking and destroying the melanocytes of the skin. It famously affected Michael Jackson, causing sections of his skin to lighten over time. (106 points, 13 comments)
    4. Utchari, one of the most difficult moves in sumo, requires a wrestler to lift their opponent entirely off the ground and throw him behind and to the side. (89 points, 7 comments)
    5. Yamadera (lit. mountain temple) is a temple complex found in Yamagata Prefecture after a thousand step climb. It's where the poet Matsuo Basho penned his famous haiku: In the stillness/the cry of the cicada/penetrates the rock. (88 points, 10 comments)
    6. Cauliflower ear occurs when a blood clot forms between ear cartilage and connective tissue. This causes the cartilage to die, creating a deformity common to grappling sports like wrestling. (39 points, 3 comments)
    7. Guillain–Barré syndrome is an autoimmune disorder in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks the peripheral nerves and damages their myelin insulation. During the disease, only a third of afflicted people are able to walk, and the exact cause of the disease can remain unknown. (33 points, 0 comments)
  18. 698 points, 7 submissions: E_Pluriscoop_Unum
    1. Roger Ebert: "Ponyo [is] one of the very rare movies where I want to sit in the front row, to drown in it. This is more than “artistry.” It is art." (211 points, 11 comments)
    2. Chocolate Rain - Tay Zonday (138 points, 7 comments)
    3. Billy West, the voice of Nickelodeon, talking about some of his voices. (122 points, 7 comments)
    4. Pingu - A beloved children's show from Switzerland (68 points, 5 comments)
    5. Nümberwang - Mitchell & Webb (58 points, 0 comments)
    6. A point about drawing swords (57 points, 3 comments)
    7. Werner Herzog's Disoriented Penguin (44 points, 3 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. wil (3635 points, 155 comments)
  2. 0and18 (584 points, 284 comments)
  3. wormspermgrrl (350 points, 214 comments)
  4. joelschlosberg (334 points, 58 comments)
  5. twitch1982 (222 points, 19 comments)
  6. balrogath (218 points, 36 comments)
  7. justtoclick (216 points, 38 comments)
  8. sverdrupian (199 points, 31 comments)
  9. appropriate-username (154 points, 49 comments)
  10. jaykirsch (151 points, 51 comments)
  11. davidystephenson (145 points, 7 comments)
  12. mrekted (138 points, 5 comments)
  13. no-fun-at-parties (136 points, 17 comments)
  14. Neebat (128 points, 17 comments)
  15. ceegee1975 (112 points, 45 comments)
  16. Disaster_Area (111 points, 4 comments)
  17. markevens (108 points, 8 comments)
  18. raendrop (107 points, 11 comments)
  19. Hazlzz (103 points, 6 comments)
  20. sunnieskye1 (99 points, 14 comments)
  21. Otterfan (96 points, 9 comments)
  22. sbroue (95 points, 18 comments)
  23. xkcd_transcriber (95 points, 11 comments)
  24. DnMarshall (95 points, 5 comments)
  25. rlbond86 (94 points, 15 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. An adult oyster is capable of filtering 25-50 gallons of water a day. by sverdrupian (1030 points, 72 comments)
  2. I was a child star in the 80s. AMA by wil (574 points, 535 comments)
  3. Legendary con man, scam artist, and forger Frank Abagnale Jr. pictured in the pilots seat of a Pan Am airliner. He flew over 1,000,000 miles while wearing a Pan Am uniform. He was never their employee, nor was he a pilot. by mrekted (484 points, 24 comments)
  4. "We come in peace" by appropriate-username (470 points, 10 comments)
  5. The anime Ghost Stories was a mediocre show without much to write home about. However, when it came time to translate it to English, the dub team was given enough leeway that they pretty much parodied the original material. The results are hilarious. by selfproclaimed (439 points, 38 comments)
  6. During Florida winters, manatees flock to nuclear and coal power plants for the warm water discharges. by wormspermgrrl (414 points, 29 comments)
  7. A brief Batman comic by Czarry (396 points, 8 comments)
  8. actress Linda Hamilton has a twin sister who made it possible for Terminator 2 to film some scenes in one camera shot without compositing by joelschlosberg (396 points, 15 comments)
  9. "Do it yourself doodler" album by justtoclick (359 points, 8 comments)
  10. Ben Franklin's daily schedule by joelschlosberg (353 points, 29 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 175 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  2. 137 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  3. 135 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  4. 101 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  5. 101 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  6. 92 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  7. 92 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  8. 87 points: deleted's comment in Cause of Death for Yuri Gagarin, 1st Man in Space, Finally Revealed
  9. 86 points: markevens's comment in Woman ruins marriage on game show and still loses
  10. 84 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
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