Running A Full Node - Bitcoin

BCH Unlimited Ubuntu PPA repo updated to version 1.8.0

The BCH Unlimited Ubuntu PPA repository has been updated to serve version 1.8.0 is available at:
 
https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin-unlimited/+archive/ubuntu/bucash
 
This release is compatible the Bitcoin Cash protocol. To update already installed packages (*):
 
sudo apt update sudo apt upgrade 
 
To install
 
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin-unlimited/bucash sudo apt-get update sudo apt install bitcoind bitcoin-qt 
 
starting from this update the repository is serving also ElectrsCash(**) v.1.1.1, for now just for the amd64 architecture. To install it just execute this command:
sudo apt install electrscash 
 
See the official announcement and the release notes for more details:
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/g3k4mbch_unlimited_180_has_just_been_released/
https://github.com/BitcoinUnlimited/BitcoinUnlimited/blob/release/doc/release-notes/release-notes-1.8.0.md
 
Known issues:
On Ubuntu 18.04 (bionic) you'll probably get an error while trying to install bitcoind. The error message is the following:
The following packages have unmet dependencies. bitcoind : Depends: libgcc-s1 (>= 3.4) but it is not installable E: Unable to correct problems, you have held broken packages. Package libgcc-s1 is not available, but is referred to by another package. This may mean that the package is missing, has been obsoleted, or is only available from another source 
It seems like libgcc-s1 which is a focal (ubuntu 20.04, still in beta) package that has somehow crept in the bionic "food-chain", I'm working on a fix right now. Thanks to xd1gital for the initial report.
Edit: to solve the problem please do:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-toolchain-test sudo apt update sudo apt dist-upgrade sudo apt install bitcoind 
 
(*) due to fact we rebranded Ubuntua PPA name along with the name of the clients, you will be displayed with this warning and question to which you could safely reply "Yes":
E: Repository 'http://ppa.launchpad.net/bitcoin-unlimited/bucash/ubuntu bionic InRelease' changed its 'Label' value from 'BU Cash' to 'BCH Unlimited' N: This must be accepted explicitly before updates for this repository can be applied. See apt-secure(8) manpage for details. Do you want to accept these changes and continue updating from this repository? [y/N] 
  (**) ElectrsCash is an efficient re-implementation of Electrum Server written in Rust.
submitted by s1ckpig to bitcoin_unlimited [link] [comments]

BCH Unlimited Ubuntu PPA repo updated to version 1.8.0

The BCH Unlimited Ubuntu PPA repository has been updated to serve version 1.8.0 is available at:
 
https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin-unlimited/+archive/ubuntu/bucash
 
This release is compatible the Bitcoin Cash protocol. To update already installed packages (*):
 
sudo apt update sudo apt upgrade 
 
To install
 
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin-unlimited/bucash sudo apt-get update sudo apt install bitcoind bitcoin-qt 
 
starting from this update the repository is serving also ElectrsCash(**) v.1.1.1, for now just for the amd64 architecture. To install it just execute this command:
sudo apt install electrscash 
 
See the official announcement and the release notes for more details:
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/g3k4mbch_unlimited_180_has_just_been_released/
https://github.com/BitcoinUnlimited/BitcoinUnlimited/blob/release/doc/release-notes/release-notes-1.8.0.md
 
Known issues:
On Ubuntu 18.04 (bionic) you'll probably get an error while trying to install bitcoind. The error message is the following:
The following packages have unmet dependencies. bitcoind : Depends: libgcc-s1 (>= 3.4) but it is not installable E: Unable to correct problems, you have held broken packages. Package libgcc-s1 is not available, but is referred to by another package. This may mean that the package is missing, has been obsoleted, or is only available from another source 
It seems like libgcc-s1 which is a focal (ubuntu 20.04, still in beta) package that has somehow crept in the bionic "food-chain", I'm working on a fix right now. Thanks to xd1gital for the initial report.
Edit: to solve the problem please do:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-toolchain-test sudo apt update sudo apt dist-upgrade sudo apt install bitcoind 
 
(*) due to fact we rebranded Ubuntua PPA name along with the name of the clients, you will be displayed with this warning and question to which you could safely reply "Yes":
E: Repository 'http://ppa.launchpad.net/bitcoin-unlimited/bucash/ubuntu bionic InRelease' changed its 'Label' value from 'BU Cash' to 'BCH Unlimited' N: This must be accepted explicitly before updates for this repository can be applied. See apt-secure(8) manpage for details. Do you want to accept these changes and continue updating from this repository? [y/N] 
  (**) ElectrsCash is an efficient re-implementation of Electrum Server written in Rust.
submitted by s1ckpig to btc [link] [comments]

(Updated) [Staking] Reddcoin Core client GUI wallet on a Raspberry Pi Model 3B

Intro

This thread is an update to my first Reddcoin staking tutorial that was written 7 months ago.
 
The reason for the update
My Reddcoin Core software crashed and became unusable. My Raspberry Pi 3B would lag and freeze, I couldn't stake anymore.
 
Instead of just redoing everything the same way, I wanted to see if I could improve on 3 points:
 
The updates
 
If you would like to tip me
Writing a tutorial like this takes time and effort; tips are appreciated. My Reddcoin address: RqvdnNX5MTam855Y2Vudv7yVgtXdcYaQAW.
     

Overview

 

Steps

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     

Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Snr5e8bzftI
This video shows how long it takes to start Reddcoin Core.   TL;DR:
     

Extra

Backup
Backup your wallet to prevent losing the RDDs in your wallet! There are two methods to backup, do both. Make new backups if you create a new receiving address!
 
 
   
Boot with only 1 USB drive plugged in:
Make sure only the USB drive (with the swap partition and data partition) is plugged in when you boot up your Raspberry Pi. This to make sure the swap partition (/dev/sda1) is recognized correctly.   If you boot up with multiple USB drives, Lubuntu might see the USB drive with the swap partition as the second drive (instead of the first drive), and ignore the 2 GB swap partition. If this happens, starting Reddcoin can render the Raspberry Pi unresponsive.
   
Connection issues If you have issues syncing the blockchain because you have 0 network connections, please follow the instructions in this thread.
   
Start Reddcoin Core easier
Run a shell script (.sh file), so you can start Reddcoin just by double clicking on an icon on your Desktop.
   
Minimization options
Adjust minimization options, so you can safely press on the X button (the close/exit button on the upper right corner).
   
RealVNC VNC Viewer (client) and VNC Connect (server): To remote connect to the Raspberry Pi, I use VNC Viewer ad VNC Connect from RealVNC.
 
   
Chromium as browser: The updates break Firefox, the browser crashes when you try to run it. Install another browser, Chromium, to solve this issue.
   
Updates / Upgrades
If Software Updater shows up and tells you that there is updated software available, do not install the updates using Software Updater. Use LXTerminal to update Lubuntu.  
     

Credits:

   
Credits in previous tutorial:
submitted by Yavuz_Selim to reddCoin [link] [comments]

Sono tornato e voglio sapere tutto quello che è successo in mia assenza!

Buongiorno eccomi qui. Per anni ho avuto la fissa della tecnologia. Appena mi alzavo la mattina la prima cosa che facevo era...la pipì. Ma poi correvo a leggere tutte le news che ruotavano intorno al mondo tecnologico e quindi: slashdot, techchrunch, punto-informatico ecc...
Poi nel 2011 ho perso completamente interesse, mi sembrava che il mondo con le app si fosse appiattito e che la tecnologia intorno al mondo IT fosse meno interessante, ma forse ero solo io che avevo bisogno di staccare la spina. Ora però voglio tornare, voglio di nuovo sapere tutto ciò che sta accadendo e che è accaduto negli anni passati.
Ho voglia però di essere aggiornato. Quali sono state secondo voi le tecnologie software/hardware, i servizi e le acquisizioni più importanti degli ultimi sei anni?
Aggiornerò questo post creando una timeline man mano che ognuno di voi fornirà informazioni attraverso i commenti.
TIMELINE
submitted by ildormiglione to ItalyInformatica [link] [comments]

BTCPay Server + EPS + RTL - how?

I am trying to build a box with: - Linux Ubuntu 18.04 - BTCPay Server, using docker - EPS (Electrum Personal Server) - RTL (Ride the lightning)
I have the full bitcoin data synced in a folder already, from a previous bitcoin-qt/bitcoind instance.
  1. Can I install BTCPay Server with docker and then run beside another docker with EPS?
  2. I understand that RTL is already integrated into BTCPay, so I just have to update the server and activate it?
  3. Is possible to integrate also EPS into the BTCPay docker file, after the installation? Or is it in "works" to be integrated in the same docker installation/update server by BTCPay ?
  4. Is possible to run EPS without docker, but using the bitcoind from BTCPay docker instance?
  5. Is possible to connect a mobile wallet (ex. Samourai) to that bitcoind instance from BTCPay Server ?
  6. One last question: is there a procedure to backup all the BTCPay server settings, for in case of disaster recovery moment? So to restore all data at once after reinstall OS ?
This is very important thing, if I start to put a BTCPay server at work in production and the machine gets fucked, how easy is to restore it?
Please somebody can respond to these questions, not in a super technical manner so many others can understand it?
Maybe u/belcher_ and u/CardCollector1 or u/NicolasDorier can help with some answers here, please?
EDIT: I hope I don't have to add a meme to this post to bring more attention... seems that lately only memes are "important" here, subjects like this are ignored. EDIT2: 21 hours and still not any answer... fuck, nobody uses BTCPay ?
submitted by Mr--Robot to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Dogecoin on Linux - The Complete Beginner's Guide

I'm writing this because I couldn't find a single condensed guide on compiling the wallet and running mining software on linux, specficially Ubuntu/Linux Mint. I combed Bitcoin and Litecoin forums for similar problems I was running into and eventually got everything nailed down, so here it is in one place, for new Shibes.
If you want to make a Dogecoin directory in your downloads folder to keep things organized, you will need to modify these commands to refelct the change. So instead of going to ~/Downloads/ you will need to go to ~/Downloads/Dogecoin and be sure to put the zipped files there when you download them, but the commands will be the same otherwise.
cwayne18 put in the work to make a PPA for the QT client here.
Ubunutu/Mint/Debian users should be able to install the client with the following commands:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:cwayne18/doge sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install dogecoin-qt 
To update using this method, run
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade dogecoin-qt 
Compiling the Wallet Manually
I suggest using the PPA above, but if you want to compile manually, here you go.
1)Download the newest source from here. If you want to check out the Github page, click here
2)Unzip the package with the native client OR, navigate to your downloads and unzip
cd ~/Downloads unzip dogecoin-master.zip 
3)Now it's time to compile. You will need to install the dependencies, just copy and paste the following code. It will be a fairly large download and could take some time. It is always important to update before installing any new software, so we'll do that first and then install the dependencies.
sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade sudo apt-get install libssl-dev libdb-dev libdb++-dev libqrencode-dev qt4-qmake libqtgui4 libqt4-dev sudo apt-get install libminiupnpc-dev libminiupnpc8 libboost-all-dev build-essential git libboost1.53-all-dev 
4)Once that is done, go to the doge-coin master directory and compile:
cd ~/Downloads/dogecoin-maste sed -i 's/-mgw46-mt-sd-1_53//g' dogecoin-qt.pro qmake USE_UPNP=- USE_QRCODE=0 USE_IPV6=0 make -j3 
After running the qmake command you will likely see some text similar to
Project MESSAGE: Building without UPNP support Project MESSAGE: Building with UPNP supportRemoved plural forms as the target language has less forms. If this sounds wrong, possibly the target language is not set or recognized. 
It's perfectly normal, so don't worry about that.
Your Dogewallet is ready to go! The executable is in ~/Downloads/dogecoin-maste and called dogecoin-qt. Your wallet information is in ~/.dogecoin. You can run the wallet at any time by opening terminal and typing
cd ~/Downloads/dogecoin-maste ./dogecoin-qt 
Future upgrades to dogewallet are easy. Back up your wallet.dat, and simply follow the same directions above, but you'll be unzipping and building the newer version. You will likely need to rename the old dogecoin-master directory in ~/Downloads before unzipping the newest version and building. Also, it is likely that you will not need to install the dependencies again.
Alternate Method For Installing Dogecoin Wallet from Nicebreakfast
After installing the dependencies listed in step 3, open terminal, then navigate to where you want Dogecoin Wallet stored and run:
git clone https://github.com/dogecoin/dogecoin ./autogen.sh ./configure make 
then when the wallet is updated just run
git pull 
from the dogecoin directory.
GPU Mining
GPU mining requires CGminer. My suggestion is to get the executable already built. The creator of cgminer has removed the built file from his website, but I've uploaded it here
sudo apt-get install pkg-config opencl-dev libcurl4-openssl-dev autoconf libtool automake m4 ncurses-dev cd ~/Downloads tar -xvf cgminer-3.7.2-x86_64-built.tar.bz2 
Don't use anything newer than 3.7.2. The newer versions of CGMiner don't support GPU mining.
That's it! You have cgminer ready to go! You will run cgminer with the following syntax
cd ~/Downloads/cgminer-3.7.2-x86_64-built/ ./cgminer --scrypt -o stratum+tcp://SERVERNAME:PORT -u WORKER.ID -p PASS 
A good guide for fine tuning cgminer can be found here; follow the litecoin example.
EDIT
I had trouble getting cgminer running with a single line command, but running it via an executable .sh file works. This is covered in the cgminer setup guide I posted above but I'll put it here too. In the same directory that has the cgminer executable, you need to make a file called cgminer.sh and make it executable. It should contain the follwing:
export GPU_USE_SYNC_OBJECTS=1 export GPU_MAX_ALLOC_PERCENT=100 export DISPLAY=:0 find *.bin -delete sleep 5 ./cgminer 
Then you can call cgminer in terminal by doing ./cgminer.sh You will need a cgminer.conf file containing all your options. All of this is covered in the guide that is linked above.
A quick note about AMD drivers: They used to be a huge PITA to install and get working, but the newest Catalyst drivers are great. There's a GUI installer, everything works out of the box, and there is a lot of documentation. You can download them here: AMD Catalyst 14.6 Beta Linux
CPU Mining
For CPU mining I use minerd because it doesn't require any work to get running, simply download it and get to work. Download the built file for your machine 32-bit or 64-bit, and then unzip it and you're ready to go!
cd ~/Downloads tar -xvf pooler-cpuminer-2.3.2-linux-x86.tar.gz 
The executable is called minerd and it will be in ~/Downloads but you can move it to wherever you like. To run it, pull up terminal and do
cd ~/Downloads minerd --url=stratum+tcp://SERVER:PORT --userpass=USERNAME.WORKERNAME:WORKERPASSWORD 
You're done! Happy mining!
Common Issues
I ran into this and I've seen others with this problem as well. Everything installs fine but there is a shared library file that isn't where it should be. In fact, it isn't there at all.
 libudev.so.1: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory 
In terminal, do
sudo updatedb locate libudev.so.0.13.0 
And it will probably return a path /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu. Inside that directory there's a library file called libudev.so.0.13.0. You'll need to make a symlink (aka shortcut) that links libudev.so.1 to libudev.so.0.13.0 So, assuming you're working with libudev.so.0.13.0 do this
cd /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu sudo ln -s libudev.so.0.13.0 libudev.so.1 
Now if you do
ln -l 
You should see
libudev.so.1 -> ./libudev.so.0.13.0 
Meaning you've made the symlink. Also, the text for libudev.so.1 will be blue.
submitted by Boozybrain to dogecoin [link] [comments]

How to Mine BiblePay on Linux

This guide is outdated, please refer to:
https://wiki.biblepay.org/POBH_Setup
https://wiki.biblepay.org/PODC_Setup
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IMPORTANT - Evolution Upgrade:
Quick Start https://wiki.biblepay.org/Quick_Start
Evolution Upgrade Information https://wiki.biblepay.org/Evolution_Upgrade
Getting Started with Evolution https://wiki.biblepay.org/Getting_Started_with_Evolution
Generic Smart Contracts https://wiki.biblepay.org/Generic_Smart_Contracts
What is BiblePay Evolution? https://www.reddit.com/BiblePay/comments/bifvpk/biblepay_evolution_what_is_it/
Recommend 2GB RAM or can get stuck compiling (if 1GB RAM can use Swap File) Use Ubuntu 16.04
INFO
https://github.com/biblepay/biblepay-evolution/blob/masteBuildBiblePay.txt
INSTALL COMMANDS
apt-get install build-essential libtool autotools-dev automake pkg-config libssl-dev libevent-dev bsdmainutils apt-get install libboost-system-dev libboost-filesystem-dev libboost-chrono-dev libboost-program-options-dev libboost-test-dev libboost-thread-dev apt-get install libqt5gui5 libqt5core5a libqt5dbus5 qttools5-dev qttools5-dev-tools libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler apt-get install git apt-get install curl build-essential libtool autotools-dev automake pkg-config python3 bsdmainutils cmake sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install libdb4.8-dev libdb4.8++-dev git clone http://github.com/biblepay/biblepay-evolution prefix=x86_64-pc-linux-gnu cd biblepay-evolution/depends make -j4 # Choose a good -j value, depending on the number of CPU cores available cd .. ./autogen.sh #Note: if echo `pwd` does not return your working directory, replace it with your working directory such as /biblepay-evolution/ ./configure --prefix `pwd`/depends/x86_64-pc-linux-gnu make # See more here: #https://github.com/biblepay/biblepay-evolution/blob/mastedoc/build-unix.md 

SWAP FILE
NOTE: if server is 1GB RAM, before running last command "sudo make", set up a swap file
free #check if swap is 0 dd if=/dev/zero of=/vaswap.img bs=1024k count=1000 mkswap /vaswap.img swapon /vaswap.img free #check if swap is 1024 sudo make 

RUN COMMAND LINE
cd src ./biblepayd -daemon 
OR
RUN GUI
Your GUI program will be located in: /biblepay-evolution/src/qt
./biblepay-qt 
You can also run it in the background (to free up your terminal) if you call it with:
./biblepay-qt & 
To start mining, instructions are the same as for Windows: Go to Tools -> Debug Console
Execute this command (to start mining with 8 threads)
setgenerate true 8 
From there you can use all other commands such as getmininginfo, getwalletinfo, etc. Execute help command to get the list of all available commands.
Note: GUI will be built automatically only if you meet the requirements for qt library, i.e. make sure you ran this line before compiling:
sudo apt-get install libqt5gui5 libqt5core5a libqt5dbus5 qttools5-dev qttools5-dev-tools libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler 
BIBLEPAY is now Running!

SETUP CONFIG
Stop BiblePay and set up the config file to get starting nodes to sync with and enable mining:
./biblepay-cli stop cd ~/.biblepayevolution/ vi biblepay.conf addnode=node.biblepay.org gen=1 genproclimit=1 
Escape Key + : (Colon Key) + w + q + Enter (saves file and quits)

addnode --- adds a node to the list of nodes to connect to gen=1 --- turns on mining genproclimit --- sets number of threads to use when mining

Run BiblePay again and fully sync with network
cd ../biblepay-evolution/src ./biblepayd -daemon ./biblepay-cli getinfo 

USEFUL COMMANDS
./biblepay-cli help ./biblepay-cli getaccountaddress "" ./biblepay-cli getinfo ./biblepay-cli getmininginfo ./biblepay-cli setgenerate true 8 ./biblepay-cli sendtoaddress "insertAddressHere" 777 "" "" true ./biblepay-cli stop ./biblepayd -daemon top #CPU usage q to quit 

MINING THREADS: To change number of threads to use up for mining
a. Edit home/yourusername/.biblepayevolution/biblepay.conf file:
genproclimit=X 
and restart BiblePay -or- b. Menu >> Tools >> Debug Console >> Type command:
setgenerate true X 
(Replace X with number of threads Use top command to view CPU usage)

POOL
NOTE: To use the pool you must now use the external miner, not the wallet miner https://whitewalr.us/2019/biblepay-nomp-pool-mining.html
  1. Set up an account on pool website: https://pool.biblepay.org/
  2. Create Worker Username(s) - Workers tab >>> Add
  3. Enable pool and add Worker Username in ~/.biblepayevolution/biblepay.conf file, add these lines and save:
    pool=https://pool.biblepay.org workerid=insertWorkerUsernameHere
4. Restart BiblePay
./biblepay-cli stop ./biblepayd -daemon 
Setup Auto-Withdraw Navigate to Account >>> Account Settings >>> Verify your BBP Receiving Address >>> Click Authorize-Auto-Withdraws

UPDATE:

### Turn off/stop BiblePay
cd /home/yourname/biblepay-evolution/src ./biblepay-cli stop 

### Pull down latest Biblepay code and build it
cd /home/yourname/biblepay-evolution git pull origin master sudo make 

### Turn BiblePay back on and check version number
cd src ./biblepayd -daemon ./biblepay-cli getinfo ./biblepay-cli setgenerate true 8 

UPDATE IN ONE COMMAND:
./biblepay-evolution/src/biblepay-cli stop ; cd && cd biblepay-evolution/ && git pull origin master && sudo make && cd src && ./biblepayd -daemon && sleep 90 && ./biblepay-cli getmininginfo 
Note: the ";" says do this after, regardless of the outcome Note: && says do this after only if previous command finished with no errors

SPEED UP COMPILE:
To speed up the compile time, add -j4 or -j8 after make. This way it compiles using 4 or 8 threads instead of just 1.
./configure LDFLAGS="-L${BDB_PREFIX}/lib/" CPPFLAGS="-I${BDB_PREFIX}/include/" sudo make -j8 
Reference: http://www.linux-databook.info/?page_id=2319

RSYNC stop biblepay from your nodes compile on your fastest machine then rsync with your machines only src folder is required
rsync -avuz /root/biblepay-evolution/src/ [email protected]:/root/biblepay-evolution/src/ 
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/3299951/how-to-pass-password-for-rsync-ssh-command https://www.thegeekstuff.com/2008/11/3-steps-to-perform-ssh-login-without-password-using-ssh-keygen-ssh-copy-id/
people make cron jobs and rsync automatically

OUTDATED

Unofficial Bash Script
https://gist.github.com/anonymous/d1c1d35e3c8f67f5fb2e204479fa5c6b

Official Ubuntu Package
https://launchpad.net/~biblepay-official

Unofficial Ubuntu Package
https://www.reddit.com/BiblePay/comments/7rwqqs/unofficial_ubuntu_packages_available/

Unofficial Mine in One Line
https://www.reddit.com/BiblePay/comments/7ryuk1/mine_in_one_line/
NOTE: DONT RUN ON A COMPUTER WITH COINS -- THIS IS A CLEAN INSTALL SCRIPT

COMPILE WITHOUT GUI: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2042657.msg21878317#msg21878317 https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2042657.msg21878389#msg21878389
ADVANCED:

DOCKER IMAGES (NOTE: I havent tested these, use at your own risk) https://hub.docker.com/gagaha/biblepay/ https://hub.docker.com/cryptozero/biblepay-opt/
submitted by togoshige to BiblePay [link] [comments]

Interested in contributing to the BTC network? Here is the steps to get a full node up and running in Linux.

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Keep your Bitcoin Core UASF node up to date

Note to folks with a fake uacomment: that neither helps nor works. Upgrade to BIP148!
Those who want to use BIP148 have two main choices: UASF BIP148 and Bitcoin Knots. The first has bip148 enabled by default. The second follows a PR originally proposed to Bitcoin Core (and rejected) which adds bip148=0 (option, disabled by default) so it needs to be enabled in configuration file or at runtime.
Make a backup of your wallet.dat, just in case.

Bitcoin Core SegWit UASF BIP148

This is the "original" BIP148 version.
1) Get the source at https://github.com/UASF/bitcoin/releases.
Current release: v1.0 - https://github.com/UASF/bitcoin/releases/tag/v0.14.2-uasfsegwit1.0
As a reminder, your install options are as follows:
a) Binaries: Bitcoin Core v0.14.2-based UASF SegWit BIP148 can be downloaded here (decompress and then run desired binary (bitcoind for daemon/server, bitcoin-cli for the CLI, etc.) which you can find in bin subdirectory; there's also a PPA for Ubuntu users who prefer apt-get install).
b) Source: get the source at the URL at the top. Build as usual, following official Bitcoin Core instructions.
To install, stop and (if you want) remove existing Bitcoin Core. Then install and run Bitcoin SegWit UASF BIP148. Windows users who use installer (filenames that end with *setup-unsigned.exe) should first uninstall existing Bitcoin Core before they install this version.
How to verify binaries (signatures):
https://np.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/6c5zw3/howto_verify_the_signed_uasf_released_binaries/
You can also verify checksums by importing Luke's PGP key and ensuring checksums in SHA256SUMS.asc(example here) match those of the downloaded file(s).

Bitcoin Knots

This is Luke-Jr's Bitcoin release with many enhancements and a BIP148 option. You can find more at https://bitcoinknots.org.
Get it at bitcoinknots.org. Install procedure for binaries is the same as for UASF BIP148 binaries, but with one added step:
Windows users who use installer (filenames that end with *setup-unsigned.exe) need to first uninstall existing Bitcoin Core before they can install this version.
If you want to build from the source, refer to Bitcoin Knots documentation (because it has a number of different options compared to Bitcoin Core).
How to verify binaries (signatures): download and import Luke's PGP key, refresh PGP keys, then verify the signed checksums file corresponds to the checksum of the binary you downloaded for your system.

Updating installed binaries

If you're updating either UASF BIP148 or Knots binaries (which you downloaded as zip or tgz file and decompressed to your disk), stop Bitcoin, decompress newer binaries over old binaries, then start service again. You can also move old binaries and then deploy the latest binaries.

Reverting to Bitcoin Core

Before chain split

Prior to chain split (such as before Aug 1), you can "go back" by simply removing BIP148 or Knots and installing Bitcoin Core 0.14.2. You can't go back to an earlier release such as 0.12 (same behavior as with Bitcoin Core).
Starting with UASF BIP148 v1.0, however, there's less need to be concerned about going back to Bitcoin Core - as mentioned above, Bitcoin Core 0.14.2 behavior can be achieved by restarting UASF BIP148 v1.0 or Bitcoin Knots with bitp148=0.
Should you want to remove UASF BIP148-compatible and run Bitcoin Core 0.14.2, you can do this:
Then install Bitcoin Core 0.14.2.

In the case of a chain split

Please remember to pay special attention to wallet.dat if you use one. This section only deals with the change of the binary and blockchain rewind, and not coin splitting and wallet backups.
If chains splits on or after August 1st, you would have to rewind the blockchain in order to use a different Bitcoin release on another chain. Details will vary depending on the circumstances (for example, we can't know in advance which chains will exist.)
UASF BIP148 v1.0 (not older releases) makes it possible to set bip148=0 and restart which automatically rewinds the blockchain to be consistent with Core. If you wanted to change to Bitcoin Core, you could first restart UASF BIP148 or Knots with bip148=0 to rewind the blockchain, then uninstall the binaries and install Bitcoin Core.
If a chain split happens, check UASFGuide.com or this subreddit for specific details.

Be back in late July!

In the second half of July, check for updates on a weekly basis. There may be further updates or improvements.

Changelog

2017-07-12 - reminder to pay attention to wallet backup in case of changing the binaries or startup options after a chain split
2017-07-11 - download links updated for v1.0, added about auto-rewind in v1.0, other small edits
Edit: this post may be updated prior to August 1st.
submitted by eustan to UASF [link] [comments]

[P2pool] How to make your own personal p2pool Node!

Tired of getting no block rewards and sending many dead shares? Need a p2pool node close to your miner? MAKE YOUR OWN! :D
And, Yep, P2pools give 0.5% Rewards to block finders!
Here's some info about p2ools: http://whatisp2pool.com/
The stronger the P2Pool network becomes the more resistant the digibyte network is to 51% attacks!
Oh and, P2pools are DDOS proof! Now that's News! So if your node gets DDOS'd .. you dont lose your shares as the shares have been saved in the p2pool, its called the sharechain. So you get paid anyhow! Thanks to the p2pool network. and you ccan set your workers to another pool using the "--failover only" command in cgminer (if im not wrong) and get it back to work on the p2pool network!
TL;DR; P2POOL = 1 Big fat network Decentrazlized pool!
STEPS TO MAKE A P2POOL:
Install Ubuntu server or Desktop if you want http://www.ubuntu.com/download/ or u can use a VPS (VirtualPrivateServer -- Link Below with coupon code)
So Let's start off in the command line (Open Terminal.. and all you have to do is Cut, Copy Paste! ;) )
Start by updating and upgrading Ubuntu, you know you want the best ;)
sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade sudo apt-get install python-software-properties sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update 
Time for the DigiByteProject dependencies!
sudo apt-get install build-essential libboost-all-dev libcurl4-openssl-dev libdb5.1-dev libdb5.1++-dev git qt-sdk libminiupnpc-dev sudo apt-get install qrencode libqrencode-dev 
And, Now to compile DigiByte on your system!
git clone git://github.com/digibyte/DigiByteProject.git digibyte #renaming makes it easier ;) cd ~/digibyte/src mkdir obj make -f makefile.unix USE_UPNP=- sudo cp digibyted /usbin cd ~ 
After it has compiled try running 'digibyted'
./digibyte/src/digibyted 
If you get an error saying you need to make the digibyte.conf file, good! :) If it doesnt give you that error, make sure you followed the compiling steps appropriately.
So, Lets create the conf file here...
cd .digibyte #edited from 'digibyted' .. fixed!! nano digibyte.conf 
Paste the following, CHANGING THE USERNAME AND PASS!! make sure to take note of both, you'll need these later!
rpcuser=CHANGEusername rpcpassword=ChangePassword daemon=1 server=1 rpcport=14022 port=12024 gen=1 rpcallowip=127.0.0.1 addnode=74.208.230.160 addnode=31.220.25.91 addnode=184.155.218.183 addnode=24.119.23.61 addnode=70.196.193.231 addnode=198.98.118.241 addnode=142.4.204.115 addnode=23.90.191.58 addnode=216.250.125.121 addnode=115.28.31.25 addnode=83.172.105.46 
Press 'CTRL' + ' X', and then 'Y' to save when prompted
cd ~ ./digibyte/src/digibyted ./digibyte/src/digibyted getinfo 
Make sure you check the latest block in the block chain or on your local DigiByte Wallets. This is to see how far your p2pool node has gotten! This is gonna take quite a while so lets CONTINUE!
Let's get the p2pool software and frontend in! Install the p2pool dependencies!
sudo apt-get install python-zope.interface python-twisted python-twisted-web git clone https://github.com/Rav3nPL/p2pool-rav p2pool #renaming it! cd ~/p2pool/digibyte_subsidy #Thanks to Chaeplin sudo python setup.py install 
Time to edit and customise the html code to personalise your p2pool's frontend. Feel free to change the p2pool name and if you're an advanced user, feel free to add your own frontend from git hub after removing the web-static folder. (OPTIONAL: by using rm -f -r web-static #in that directory. And then you can choose whichever frontend you want! by cloning it in the web-static folder)
Editing the current frontend html!
cd .. cd web-static nano index.html 
After personalising the page, i.e. changing the p2pool name and adding some info! Lets go back and check how far the block downloading has gotten! You can check this by typing this in the command line after going back to the root directory:
cd ~ ./digibyte/src/digibyted getinfo 
This is gonna take a while so might as well check for updates again :P
sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade 
After making sure that all the blocks have been synced locally! We're ready to run the p2pool node! Simply enter the string below in the command line, entering your USERNAME and PASS that you saved earlier!
screen -d -m -S myp2pool ~/p2pool/run_p2pool.py --give-author 0 --net digibyte NEWUSER NEWPASS --outgoing-conns 4 
If you want to charge a fee for your node add this to your string, adding your fee address!:
--fee 1.0 --address NEWDGBADDRESS 
To see if the node is up and running enter this in the command line:
screen -x myp2pool 
'CTRL' + 'A' + 'D' to close the terminal if you press 'CTRL' + 'C', it will terminate the p2pool program and you'll have to restart the pool by using the string above!
Once, Everything is setup as planned! Check your p2pool node's ip Address by entering this into the command line:
ifconfig 
inet addr: 192.168.1.1 #You'll see a line like this.
So, Your cgminer string should look something like this:
cgminer --scrypt -o 192.168.1.1:9022 -u DGBADDRESS -p x
And your p2pool WEB ADDRESS should look like this:
192.168.1.1:9022
example: http://192.168.1.1:9022/
You can monitor your p2pool using that web address! Enjoy, your personal p2pool node!! :D
If for whatever reason the server shuts off and you need to restart the p2pool node, you should run digibyted again and after it has synced successfully, just type in your p2pool string:
./digibyte/src/digibyted
screen -d -m -S myp2pool ~/p2pool/run_p2pool.py --give-author 0 --net digibyte NEWUSER NEWPASS --outgoing-conns 4 --fee 1.0 --address NEWADDRESS
PRESS CTRL + A + D to Detach from screen
UPDATE Follow Guide below if you used this guide before DigibByte v2.0 was released (28th Feb 2014)
You must check whether you're on the right ShareChain. Make Sure the block Value says 7960!
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=408268.msg5440858#msg5440858
This Tutorial was made with the help of an existing Guide: http://doges.org/index.php?topic=5586.0 Kudos to crypto49er!
If you want to do this on a VPS:
Here's a link to a VPS hosting site:
https://www.digitalocean.com/
Feel free to use my $10 ref. code -- it doesnt really make a difference, though.
https://www.digitalocean.com/?refcode=dc909c442664
Let me know if this guide helped!
submitted by StormMiner to Digibyte [link] [comments]

[TUTORIAL:] Creating a custom wallet. Part 1: Proof of concept.

Download and view this tutorial on GITHUB
I'm teaching myself the technical aspects of Bitcoin. I decided to start by making a custom wallet. Here is my quick and dirty proof of concept using Python, bitoinrpc, and PyQt.
So far, this only queries bitcoind for getinfo. It's only a stepping stone to the greater application.
I'll make more tutorials as the program develops. Please feel free to comment and ask questions. Keep in mind, Python isn't my primary language. I decided to go with Python only because I could use the practice.
I wrote this using Linux. It should work on Windows / Mac, but your mileage may vary. To use this, you are going to need Python 2.7 installed on your machine (obviously) as well as the dependent libraries: PyQt, Python bitcoinrpc, and json. Copy and paste the code in a file somewhere and run
$ python  
Change "rpc_username" and "rpc_password" to match that of ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Make sure ./bitcoind -server is running
If everything is set up correctly you should see a gui app appear with the same information as if you were to run bitcoind getinfo from the command line.
#!/usbin/python # -*- coding: utf-8 -*- import sys from PyQt4 import QtGui from bitcoinrpc.authproxy import AuthServiceProxy import json class Configuration(): def __init__(self): self.protocol = "http" self.username = "rpc_username" self.password = "rpc_password" self.ip = "localhost" #self.port = "18332" self.port = "8332" def get_uri(self): self.uri = self.protocol+"://"+self.username+":"+self.password+"@"+self.ip+":"+self.port return self.uri class Command(): def __init__(self): self.conf = Configuration() self.access = AuthServiceProxy(self.conf.get_uri()) def get_info(self): self.info = self.access.getinfo() #self.info = self.access.listaccounts() return self.info class UI(QtGui.QWidget): def __init__(self): super(UI, self).__init__() self.init_ui() def init_ui(self): command = Command() info = command.get_info() keys = info.keys() label = [] line_edit = [] for (i, key) in enumerate(keys): label.append(QtGui.QLabel(str(keys[i]))) line_edit.append(QtGui.QLineEdit(str(info[keys[i]]))) grid = QtGui.QGridLayout() grid.setSpacing(10) for (i, item) in enumerate(label): grid.addWidget(label[i], i, 0) grid.addWidget(line_edit[i], i, 1) self.setLayout(grid) self.setGeometry(300, 300, 350, 300) self.setWindowTitle('getinfo') self.show() def main(): app = QtGui.QApplication(sys.argv) ex = UI() sys.exit(app.exec_()) if __name__ == '__main__': main() 
Features of note:
In the future I may just link to a github account. Time permitting.
Let me know what you think. Thanks!
submitted by Joshka to BitcoinDevelopers [link] [comments]

Interested in contributing to the BTC community? Here is a exhaustive manual to get you up and running. (Only takes about 20-30 minutes if you are fluent in command prompt on linux).

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to rBitcoin [link] [comments]

Running a full node using Bitcoin-daemon. Instructions for Linux.

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to BTC_Reviews [link] [comments]

How to Install Bitcoin Core Wallet on Ubuntu 16 Installing Bitcoin-Qt [Streamed] - Compiling a Bitcoin Wallet for Windows 6. bitcoin-qt How to install Bitcoin on Ubuntu 16.04

cmake-gui: cannot connect to X server. I would really appreciate any help or guidance on what to do to get it going. I believe that the server edition misses on GUI front for the Ubuntu, but is there any way I can the application working. Running a full-fledged Ubuntu VM is heavy. Bitcoin Core integration/staging tree. https://bitcoincore.org. What is Bitcoin? Bitcoin is an experimental digital currency that enables instant payments to anyone, anywhere in the world. Bitcoin uses peer-to-peer technology to operate with no central authority: managing transactions and issuing money are carried out collectively by the network. When you enter the following command you’ll see nothing because Bitcoin isn’t running yet, but we’ll leave it like this for now: $ tail -f ~/.bitcoin/debug.log. In the other terminal window we opened, run Bitcoin by entering the following: $ bitcoin-qt. You’ll see the loading image and then the GUI with a message that shows the syncing The Bitcoin Core daemon (bitcoind) is not included in the .dmg file you may have downloaded to install Bitcoin-QT. Bitcoind, along with its support binaries, is instead included in the OS X .tar.gz file listed on the official Bitcoin Core download page. Bitcoin Core is a community-driven free software project, released under the MIT license. Verify release signatures Download torrent Source code Show version history. Bitcoin Core Release Signing Keys v0.8.6 - 0.9.2.1 v0.9.3 - 0.10.2 v0.11.0+ Or choose your operating system. Windows exe - zip.

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How to Install Bitcoin Core Wallet on Ubuntu 16

How to install Bitcoin on Ubuntu 16.04 On this video, I will show you how to install Bitcoin on Ubuntu 16.04 Commands sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update “sudo apt ... Bitcoin Core is the open source client of the bitcoin cryptocurrency. Initially, the software was published by Satoshi Nakamoto under the name Bitcoin, then Bitcoin-Qt and later renamed to Bitcoin ... To add the PPA and install Bitcoin open a terminal window (press Ctrl+Alt+T) and copy+paste the following lines: sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin -y sudo apt update && sudo apt install ... How to run Bitcoin-qt as a server with a configuration file (3 of 6) - Duration: 5:48. Lars Holdgaard 11,060 views. 5:48. How To Build Raw Bitcoin Transactions in NodeJS - Duration: 16:57. RPC commands: - getbalance - getwalletinfo - getnewaddress - getblockcount - getnetworkinfo www.bitcoinhackers.org @402PaymentRequierd ...

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